Cataracts 101 — the Details

Cataract Treatment Stockton | Cataracts Manteca CAIt’s estimated that 20 million people over age 40 in the U.S. have cataracts. At Central Valley Eye Medical Group, cataract diagnosis and surgery are one of our specialties.  We’re even one of the few eye specialists that practice laser cataract surgery, to not only shape the lens but also to remove the need for a surgical blade to make the initial incision. The surgery can change a patient’s vision so dramatically, it’s incredible. Here is some information on cataracts, especially since they are such a common eye problem as we age.

What are cataracts?

Cataracts are a common eye condition characterized by clouding of the eye’s lens, the transparent film that focuses the images as seen by the eye on the light-sensitive retina at the back of the eye. This condition usually occurs when proteins form abnormal clumps in the lens. When these clumps enlarge, they begin to interfere with vision by distorting the passage of light through the lens. The result is an increasing cloudiness that affects vision, especially at night.

What are the causes of cataracts?

The effects of aging, combined with lifelong sun exposure (especially here in sunny California), cause cataracts to develop usually beginning around age 40. The cloudiness progresses slowly, not usually affecting vision until after the age of 60. Other contributing factors to the development of cataracts are smoking, eye trauma, chronic diabetes, radiation treatments, and corticosteroid medications. Cataracts can be present in infants at birth, usually due to infection, but those cases are very rare.

What are the symptoms of cataracts?

There’s a serious problem with cataracts, which is maybe why they are the world’s leading cause of blindness. In most cases, cataracts don’t show any symptoms until the protein clumps grown large enough to affect the patient’s vision. Because the development is very gradual, patients often don’t even realize they have cataracts. But when they reach a certain point of development, various symptoms will show themselves: cloudy, blurry vision; double vision; seeing halos around lights; inability to see bright color; increased sensitivity to glare; and distortion, which can be akin to looking at the world through a veil.

What is the treatment for cataracts?

You can’t treat cataracts. The only remedy is to have the clouded natural lens surgically removed and replaced with an intraocular artificial lens. The severity of your vision impairment is the deciding factor. When everyday actions like driving at night and recognizing faces become difficult, it is time to opt for surgery with the team at Central Valley. If you have cataracts in both eyes, the surgery is performed separately for each eye, allowing the first eye to recover with its new lens before removing the second bad lens. The second surgery will usually follow two to four weeks after the first. While this sounds daunting, recovery is relatively easy.

What can I expect after my cataract surgery?

Cataract surgery is usually an outpatient procedure performed under local anesthesia. The procedure often takes no longer than 10 minutes to perform. Then, you will recover for 30 minutes or so and be taken home (you can’t drive yourself) with a pair of dark sunglasses to protect your eye from bright light. At home, you will wear a protective shield over your eye when you sleep.

Many patients report clear vision within several hours after cataract surgery, but everyone heals differently. It can take a week or two to see things in the sharpest focus. Until then, there can be some blurry vision, as your eye adjusts to the removal of the cataract and the intraocular lens that replaced it. There is not usually any pain associated with recovery.

Sick of seeing the world through a dirty window? Call the team at Central Valley Eye Medical Group, 1-800-244-9907, to schedule a consultation.

Posted in: Cataracts

CONTACT US FOR MORE INFORMATION

  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

Dear Friends,

We at Central Valley Eye hope you and your families are well. During these uncertain times, we are taking all necessary precautions to keep patients and staff healthy as COVID-19 infections continue to rise. We are following CDC and American Academy of Ophthalmology guidelines, including extra diligent cleaning, and disinfecting around the office. Our waiting rooms have been reconfigured to allow more distance between chairs, and we are turning away all non-urgent patients who are symptomatic with cough or fever.

In keeping with government and institutional guidelines, as well as to promote the practice of "staying at home," we are implementing new restrictions. Starting March 20th, we will be limiting our clinic only to patients with eye conditions that could permanently threaten vision if not addressed within two months. This means that many appointments will need to be rescheduled. Additionally, some of our office locations may be closed on certain days, as patient volumes are expected to decrease significantly. If you are unsure whether to come in for your visit, please call us.

The clinic is also establishing a telemedicine service to address eye problems that are less urgent, which can be managed over the phone by a physician.

The doctors at Central Valley Eye will not be performing any non-urgent surgeries until further notice. Our surgery coordinators will be contacting patients to reschedule the surgeries that need to be postponed.

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact us at 209-952-3700.

Warmest regards,

Brandy Simpson
Practice Manager
Central Valley Eye Medical Group, Inc.

  |  

  |