Blepharitis

Having an inflamed eyelid isn’t unusual. It may feel as if you have a piece of sand in your eye or your eyelashes could be crusty in the morning when you awake. Just about everyone has this kind of inflammation at one time or another. To the team at Central Valley Eye Medical Group, we call it blepharitis. Here’s some information about this inflammation and what you can do about it.


Types of Blepharitis

  • Seborrhea blepharitis — This is the most common form of eyelid inflammation. It isn’t due to an infection but is caused by improper function of the oil glands that lubricate the eyes. This causes greasy, waxy scales to accumulate along the eyelid margins. Nutrition, hormones, stress, and your physical condition are factors in seborrhea blepharitis.
  • Ulcerative blepharitis — This form is less common, but is more severe. Matted hard crusts form around the eyelashes, but when they are removed, they leave small sores that then bleed or ooze. There can also be chronic tearing and loss of the eyelashes.
  • Staphylococcus blepharitis — This form is caused by the Staphylococci bacteria. This form of blepharitis results in collar scales on the lashes, crusting, and chronic redness at the lid margin. It may also cause sties, chalazia, the loss of the eyelashes, and dilated blood vessels.

What Are the Symptoms of Blepharitis?

  • Itchy, burning, watery eyes
  • Blurred vision
  • Crusted eyes when you first wake
  • Dry eyes
  • Eyelashes that grow at different angles
  • Greasy eyelids
  • Itchy eyes
  • Red eyelids
  • Swelling
  • Frequent sty formation
  • Scaly flakes along the eyelid margins

How Do We Treat Blepharitis?

At Central Valley Eye Medical Group, we’ll show you how to clean your eyelashes, as this is usually the most effective way to control your blepharitis. A very warm washcloth applied to the eyelids until it cools one important cleaning method. You can also lightly scrub your eyelids with a washcloth moistened with warm water and wrapped around your finger.

If your blepharitis is more involved, we may prescribe eye drops or ointment. In some cases, oral medication (usually antibiotics) may be prescribed to alter the oil composition of the eyelid oil glands.

Do you have the symptoms of blepharitis? Call the team at Central Valley Eye Medical Group, (800) 244-9907, and let’s take a look.

Posted in: Blepharitis

CONTACT US FOR MORE INFORMATION

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Dear Friends,

We at Central Valley Eye hope you and your families are well. With COVID-19 infections continuing to rise, we are taking all necessary precautions to keep patients and staff healthy as we continue to provide the eye care that our community needs:
  • Whenever appropriate, we are rescheduling any patients with cough or cold symptoms
  • We have adjusted our schedule to decrease the number of patients in our waiting rooms. You can expect on average between zero and one patient to be in the waiting room at any given time.
  • We have increased our already strict sanitizing practices to extend into the waiting areas and halls.
  • Whenever appropriate, we are diverting visits to telemedicine (by cell phone, tablet, laptop, or desktop). Please contact us for further details at 209-952-3700.



    Additionally, some of our office locations may be closed on certain days. If you are unsure whether to come in for your visit, please call us.

    The doctors at Central Valley Eye will not be performing any non-urgent surgeries until further notice. Our surgery coordinators will be contacting patients to reschedule the surgeries that need to be postponed.

    If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact us at 209-952-3700.

    Warmest regards,

    Brandy Simpson
    Practice Manager
    Central Valley Eye Medical Group, Inc.
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